William A. Levinson
Principal Consultant at Levinson Productivity Systems
William Levinson is the principal of Levinson Productivity Systems, P.C. He is an ASQ Fellow, Certified Quality Engineer, Quality Auditor, Quality Manager, Reliability Engineer, and Six Sigma Black Belt. He holds degrees in chemistry and chemical engineering from Penn State and Cornell Universities, and night school degrees in business administration and applied statistics from Union College, and he has given presentations at the ASQ World Conference, ISO/Lean Six Sigma World Conference, and others.

Upcoming Webinar
Four Key Performance Indicators for Continual Improvement
Henry Ford achieved proven world-class results with four key performance indicators (KPIs) to drive continual improvement: waste of the time of things (cycle time), waste of the time of people (motion inefficiency), waste of materials, and waste of energy. These KPIs encompass all seven wastes of the Toyota production system, and are easily understood and applied by all members of the organization.
Live Session Tuesday, 03 December 2019, 10:00 AM PDT | 01:00 PM EDT, Duration: 60 Minutes

Recorded Webinar
Drive Continuous Improvement with Shingo Maps and ISO 9001:2015
Shingo process maps were developed originally to support kaizen events and other improvement events. They can, however, support managed continual improvement along with ISO 9001:2015's requirement (7.5) for documented information; a common role of the traditional process flowchart. The Shingo map can not only document the process, it can identify waste during the planning process (6.1 Actions to Address Risks and Opportunities) and identify waste during operations by using data from operations (9.1, Monitoring, Measuring, Analysis, and Evaluation). The Shingo map is capable of exposing all forms of waste including wasted cycle time, wasted materials and wasted energy.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Why and How to use Design of Experiments
Design of Experiments (DOE) is a key tool for quality management and continual improvement, as well as part of the Six Sigma body of knowledge. It allows the scientific determination, beyond a quantifiable reasonable doubt, of whether there is a difference between two or more treatments (such as a control or experiment), or treatment combinations. This in turn allows us to determine whether a proposed improvement worked, and also to pinpoint the source of poor quality when a cause and effect diagram suggests multiple sources.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

The Hatto ("Sudden Awareness") Report - Use Stakeholder-Initiated CAPA to Drive Improvement
Frontline workers and other relevant interested parties such as customers and suppliers are often in the best position to identify risks and opportunities (ISO 9001:2015 clause 6.1) related to safety, quality, and waste. The hatto (sudden awareness) report, or stakeholder-initiated CAPA, empowers your stakeholders to expose safety hazards, risks of poor quality, and opportunities to remove waste that would otherwise remain hidden. The webinar will present numerous examples that show how stakeholder-initiated improvements can realize enormous bottom line financial results.
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How Variation Undermines Performance and What You Can Do About It
The role of variation in product dimensions is well known to the quality profession, and the subject of process capability studies. Variation also affects, however, most business activities including services. Variation is why lines of angry customers often back up in front of service desks that have (on paper) excess capacity, and why traffic jams often appear out of nowhere. The underlying causes are similar; favorable variation does not offset unfavorable variation in these applications.
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Process Capability: When It's Not a Bell Curve
Organizations must often perform process capability studies for customers and/or their own use. The information from the studies, such as the estimated process standard deviation, is then used to set control limits for statistical process control (SPC) charts. The textbook assumption is, however, that the process data follow the normal or bell curve distribution, which is far more common in textbooks than in the real world. This webinar will show how to handle situations in which the distribution is not a bell curve.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Get Lean, Not Mean - Secrets of the Toyota Production System
The Toyota production system (TPS) originated at the Ford Motor Company during the first part of the 20th century was implemented and improved in Japan by Taiichi Ohno. Its focus is the elimination of waste (muda) from all aspects of manufacturing, and its principles extend into service operations (such as health care) as well. Deployment of the TPS has been proven to allow the simultaneous reduction of prices, increase in wages, and increase in profits, and therefore a win-win outcome for all supply chain stakeholders (relevant interested parties in ISO 9001).
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Value Stream and Shingo Maps: Keys to Success
The Shingo process map, a form of value stream map, was developed originally to support kaizen events and other improvement events. Shingo maps can, however, support managed continual improvement along with ISO 9001:2015's requirement (7.5) for documented information; a common role of the traditional process flowchart. The Shingo map can not only document the process, it can (1) identify waste during the planning process (6.1 Actions to Address Risks and Opportunities) and (2) identify waste during operations by using data from operations (9.1, Monitoring, Measuring, Analysis, and Evaluation). The Shingo map is capable of exposing all forms of waste including (1) wasted cycle time, (2) wasted materials, and (3) wasted energy.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Dynamic Control Plans Drive Continuous Improvement
Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) and the control plan that defines critical to quality process activities and their required controls are both parts of Advanced Quality Planning (AQP). The close relationship between the FMEA and the control plan suggests their combination into a dynamic control plan (DCP); a living document that supports continual improvement and reflects changes in the FMEA.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

ISO 9001:2015 Transition Readiness: Not Too Early to Start
ISO 9001:2015 contains a handful of significant changes from the 2008 standard and a quality management system (QMS) that meets the requirements of ISO 9001:2008 should already meet most of the new requirements. It is, however, not too early to begin the transition if this has not already been started. This presentation will discuss the new requirements, the necessary transition activities, and some tips that might make the transition easier.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Why and How to use Design of Experiments
Design of Experiments (DOE) is a key tool for quality management and continual improvement, as well as part of the Six Sigma body of knowledge. It allows the scientific determination, beyond a quantifiable reasonable doubt, of whether there is a difference between two or more treatments (such as a control or experiment) or treatment combinations. This in turn allows us to determine whether a proposed improvement worked and also to pinpoint the source of poor quality when a cause and effect diagram suggests multiple sources.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Lean 6S: 5S+ Safety
5S-CANDO (Seiri, Seitori, Seiso, Shitsuke, Seiketsu = Clearing Up, Arranging, Neatness, Discipline, Ongoing Improvement) is an ongoing process of workplace organization and continual improvement. It supports safety (the 6th S) along with lean manufacturing considerations such as motion efficiency, visual controls, and single unit flow, and quality considerations line preventive maintenance. The result is a clean and organized workplace in which abnormalities (such as leaking oil or hydraulic fluid, and dropped parts) become immediately visible, and in which safety is promoted by the absence of clutter.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Statistical Process Control - Keys to Prevent Process Variation and Ensure Quality
Attend this session to understand the fundamentals of statistical process control, including its role in the proactive detection of process shifts that would otherwise cause nonconformances if not corrected.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis
Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a closed loop continuous improvement activity that begins by planning for quality. It identifies what can go wrong with a product or process, the severity and probability of the undesirable event, and existing controls (if any) to prevent or mitigate the problem. It is however not a once-and-done activity because it is updated to reflect actions taken to remove or mitigate failure modes. An FMEA is therefore a living document and continual improvement activity that supports other elements of the quality management system.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Risk Based Thinking in and Beyond ISO 9001:2015
Clause 6.1 of ISO 9001:2015 requires the organization to implement "actions to address risks and opportunities" relevant to (1) understanding the organization and its context and (2) understanding needs and expectations of interested parties. These considerations are mandatory conditions of achieving ISO 9001:2015 certification, but they might not be sufficient to ensure world-class performance or even survival. We must look beyond the standard's stated requirements if we want the standard to be our servant rather than our master.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

Reduce Inspection Costs with Sequential Sampling in ANSI/ASQ Z1.4
Sequential sampling, in which the sample size is one, minimizes the average sample number (ASN) necessary to reach a decision as to whether to accept or reject a lot. This, in turn, minimizes the mandatory but non-value-adding inspection activity. This webinar will show how to translate an ANSI/ASQ Z1.4 sample plan into a sequential plan for normal and tightened inspection. (It is also possible to do this for reduced inspection, but the administrative complexity is greater and the benefits fewer.) The sequential plan provides comparable protection against poor quality as shown by its operating characteristic (OC) curve.
Recorded Session Get life time access for one participant with download option!

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